mopping-the-floor

How to Maintain a Clean Epoxy Floor

Maintaining a clean epoxy floor is not as hard as it seems…

After completing your epoxy floor, you might be wondering, how do I clean and properly maintain my epoxy floor? Fortunately, Epoxy floor care is extremely easy. Since Epoxy is highly resistance to dust and dirt, cleaning your epoxy floor is a simple task.

Mopping the Floor

For regular cleaning of your floor, a simple dust mop will work wonders. Applying your dust mop around once a week is the best way to clean epoxy floors and to gather up strangling dust or dirt. If desired, you can also take a hose to wash down your entire floor and then use a squeegee to absorb the residue. Every three or four months a more vigorous scrub may be required to obtain a clean epoxy floor. This is especially the case when your floor is heavily trafficked by machinery. You’ll need a hard foam mop, as a string mop will leave streak marks and will not clean your epoxy floors with the most efficiency.

Cleaning Products

As for Epoxy floor cleaning products, it’s highly recommended to use an 8:1 ratio of simple green in a spray bottle mixed with hot water. Another option for cleaning your floors is applying one half of a cup of ammonia to a gallon of hot water. After applying these solutions to your floor, you can easily let the floor air dry, but to speed up the process, a clean towel can be used.

While an ammonia or simple green solution will work wonders to keep your epoxy floor clean, extra care will be required to keep the professional gloss coating in the event of staining. For this use a still nylon brush with a stronger simple green solution. However, if you apply too much force to your cleaning, there is a chance that your epoxy floor might become less glossy, so make sure to take that precaution.

If you have occurred stubborn salt film or rust stains. Using a 1:1 ratio of CLR brand cleaner with warm water. Using a scrub pad or brush firmly clean the surface, and then douse with cold water. However if you have decided to partake in this method, it is advised that you do not let the solution sit for a long period of time on the surface. A minute or two should be all that is needed for your cleaning needs.

Some products that may be kept in your brewery may leave a deglossing effect on your floor, thankfully, this usually can be removed by simply applying hot water and a deck brush. Most of the products needed to take care of your epoxy floor are found at your local hardware store, so there is little difficulty in finding the supplies needed for maintenance.

A warning for when you are cleaning your epoxy floor, stay away from certain products. Using citrus cleaners or vinegar can also cause your epoxy floor to lose its glossy shine. Cleaners with soap also have the possibility of leaving streak marks on your floor and will increase the likelihood that your floor will become slippery when wet. This is why chemical cleaners such as simple green and ammonia are recommended for cleaning your epoxy floors.

Remember that your epoxy floors are extremely durable, but are not indestructible. Damage will occur and accidents are bound to happen. Fortunately most stains can easily be removed, with the right knowledge and a proper amount of elbow grease.

By now you should fully understand the best way to maintain your new floor for your brewery and are on a quick and easy trip to a clean epoxy floor. By sticking to basic maintenance and staying away from products that can be harmful to your floor, your epoxy floor should remain in pristine condition for years to come.

24 replies
  1. Shital
    Shital says:

    We are using black epoxisy but after use that try very dirty because of Epoxy spreading…any solvent for cleaning the Epoxy from fixtures

    Reply
  2. Benny
    Benny says:

    Will cleaning a epoxy floor with solvent based degreaser and not washing off properly leave a film on the epoxy floor?

    Reply
  3. Mark
    Mark says:

    Hello, you say, “to use an 8:1 ratio of simple green in a spray bottle mixed with hot water.” Is that really 8 parts simple green and 1 part water or did you mean 1 part simple green and 8 parts water?

    Reply
    • alex
      alex says:

      Hello Mark, we suggest using 8 parts water to 1 part of simple green. You can use a more concentrated solution as well this is what we have found works well though.

      Reply
  4. David Mathew
    David Mathew says:

    I am really amazed how i got your article at good chances. Such a good piece of article for the maintainence of the epoxy flooring. can this applicable for all types of epoxy flooring too?

    Reply
    • alex
      alex says:

      Hi David,

      Most epoxy floors are similar in chemical makeup but I would always advise checking with the manufacturer and reading the tech data sheets for any specifics. Some extremely acidic cleaners can cause more harm than good.

      Cheers!

      Reply
    • alex
      alex says:

      Thanks Ruth! Epoxy floors are a great option for floor covering for a multitude of uses. One just needs to make sure they know how to properly maintain them.

      Reply
  5. Christa Morgan
    Christa Morgan says:

    What about sterilizing the floors? We have a kennel and I need to sterilize regularly but do not want to strip the epoxy. What is safe to use to sanitize and what is the process that should be followed?

    Reply
    • alex
      alex says:

      Hi Christa,

      A safe way to sterilize the floors without stripping the epoxy would be to use the following mixture to mop.
      – 1/3 cup dish-washing liquid
      – 5 liters of water

      You can actually use this everyday and the detergent will not have adverse effects on the epoxy.

      Reply
    • alex
      alex says:

      Hi Alex,

      What has proven to work for us is the following method:

      What you’ll Need:
      -Isopropyl alcohol
      -Oxalic Acid Powder
      – Rubber Gloves
      – 2 White Rags (or clean ones work as well!)

      Instructions
      1. Take a white rag or old clean cloth and dampen it with isopropyl alcohol.
      2. Rub the floor stains with the dampened ragged for 1-2 minutes.
      3. Take the oxalic acid powder and mix with water.
      4. Using another clean lightly rub the stains to remove them.
      5. If there is an overbearing odor make sure to open the windows to get ventilation in the room.

      The whole process can be done in under 10 minutes!

      Cheers,

      The Brew Floors Team

      Reply
    • alex
      alex says:

      Thanks David! This method is one we know to work well and stand behind. We are always looking for other cleaning methods but as it stands today this is the most cost effective and efficient method we would recommend.

      Cheers!

      Reply
  6. Harv Adams
    Harv Adams says:

    Ok, so I bought my house a couple years back and it has a nice epoxy coating on the garage floor, It was getting dirty so last spring I went to the local hardware to purchase a cleaner and they sold me a citrus based cleaner.
    .It definitely removed the stains along with the glossy finish. What can I apply to bring back the gloss?

    Reply
    • alex
      alex says:

      Hi Harv,

      You best bet is probably putting down another topcoat over the epoxy. I would suggest renting a floor buffer and putting a sanding pad on it to give the surface some texture. You want to use a high grit pad (one that is not as aggressive) then vacuum off any excess dirt and debris. We sell a topcoat that works well for garage floors. It’s a 1 part no mix coating that comes with nonskid additive and is very scratch resistant. I will send you an email with more info on it!

      – The Brew Floors Team

      Reply
  7. Terri Rogers
    Terri Rogers says:

    I have epoxy on my front porch. It has some white discoloring on the edge where you step down to our concrete walkway. What should I use to get rid of that discoloration. I can send a pic if you like. Thanks so much.

    Reply
    • alex
      alex says:

      Hey Terri,

      If the discoloring has been there for some years then it might be tough to remove at this point. An acid based cleaner if most likely your best bet here but this could do more harm than good. Feel free to send over a pic to info@brewfloors.com and I can definitely take a closer look for you.

      Cheers,
      The Brew Floors Team

      Reply

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